Posts Tagged ‘Shopping’

The Washington Agreement and World Gold Demand

November 21st, 2022

In 1980, the price of gold crested around $850 per ounce. It had risen quite a bit from the official price of $35 per ounce when President Richard Nixon severed the link between gold and the dollar in August 1971.

The price rose from that $35 to around $400 per ounce as of November 1979. That is partly because President Nixon also removed the legal restrictions on US residents owning physical gold, except as jewelry, and because during the 1970s the US economy went to Hell in a hand wagon, increasing the demand for gold ownership to protect people from economic catastrophe. That was similar to what is happening today, when doom and gloomer gold bugs are preaching the gospel of gold.

In early 1980, perhaps due to the Iranian hostage crisis that began in November 1979 and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in December 1979, gold peaked to over $800 per ounce.

However, it quickly fell back to around $400. It then entered a two-decade long bear sideways market. Although the gold bugs continued to preach the gospel, and the economy did not begin to improve until 1982, gold didn’t recover for a long time.

Part of the reason, besides lack of demand by investors enjoying the prosperity of the 1980s and 1990s, were sales by central banks, and forward sales by gold producers locking in the price.

Talismans and Amulets: An Enduring Tradition of Meaningful Jewelry

April 1st, 2022

What are Talismans and Amulets?
In his article “Dragons as Amulets, Dragons as Talismans, Dragons as Counselors” professor Robert G. Stevens provides a very effective description of what a talisman is and what it imparts to it’s bearer: “A talisman is an object that exerts an influence for good fortune to occur to the one who possesses it.” He further explains, “It transforms the person who holds it so that he or she can accomplish great deeds.” Comparatively he describes amulets as objects believed to protect and ward off evil or harm. So close are these two purposes that it is not uncommon for the distinction between talismans and amulets to be blurred so that the two terms are used interchangeably.

A talisman or amulet can take many forms, but most common are pendants or charms worn on the body. They can also be made of many different materials and in most instances the material from which they are made contributes to their intended power. If an item is made of wood, the type of wood chosen is of significance, if made of metal, then the type of metal dictates the affect the object will have, likewise if stones are included, then their color is both symbolic and influential. Other examples include common objects which have an unusual malformation (four-leaved clovers), animal parts or carvings of animals, relics of religious icons and heirlooms once owned by ancestors. Ultimately, the power of a meaningful piece of jewelry is determined by the social, spiritual and emotional relevance that an object acquires as dictated by the culture the individual inhabits and the individual’s personal experience surrounding the object.

Talismans and War
Historically, it has not been at all uncommon for warriors to carry talisman objects into battle. When the threat of probable death or other trauma is facing an individual it is human nature to seek protection and a means to bolster the internal will to counter anxiety. In a 2003 Washington Post article it was predicted that more than 50 percent of soldiers take some object of significance with them when they are deployed. These objects take the form of pendants that can be worn securely on the body but can also be religious books, letters, photos or even dog tags that belong to a military relative. Religious affects are nearly universal talismans worn by soldiers as exemplified by carved pendants of Buddha handed out to the military in Thailand, Koranic scripture carried by Muslims and medallions depicting Catholic saints worn by soldiers in Europe and America. During WWI many soldiers carried some form of Psalm 91, commonly referred to as the “Soldier’s Psalm” on their persons, a particular talisman that is still popular amongst military as a form of protection. Also common is for a talisman object to be acquired by a soldier’s family and presented to the soldier as a direct connection to kin while away from home.

Talismans and Native American Culture
Native American talisman jewelry with its liberal use of animalistic iconography is quite popular in the Western world. In a time when human impact on the environment has put our own well-being in jeopardy, many are seeking a way to realign themselves with the natural world. The adoption of animal talismans is one path toward achieving this integration. Anther reason people are fond of adopting these animal icons is because of their symbolic association with particular attributes that the wearers would like to gain themselves.

Some common motifs in Native American spiritual jewelry include the eagle, stallion, bear and buffalo. The eagle is often considered the king of birds, a symbol of victory and power; according to Native American belief, the soaring power of the eagle contains the capacity to correct the imbalance of evil influences. North American tribes are still the most prevalent wearers of eagle talismans worldwide, whether for ceremonial regalia or everyday wear. Both the stallion and buffalo symbolize strength, while the bear symbolizes strength and leadership.